Literacy Center - Schoolhouse Teachers

Literacy Center

Teach Your Child to Read in 101 Simple Steps

Reading is the building block of academic success! As parents and teachers, we want our students to be able to not only master reading, but also enjoy reading! The Literacy Center covers pre-reading and reading from a preschool-2nd grade level and reading comprehension through a 3rd-4th grade level. Please remember that every child will learn at his or her own pace, so please do not feel locked into these grade levels.

Download a printable version of the SchoolhouseTeachers.com Literacy Center.

Can’t get to the library? We have some downloadable books as well as online books for you to enjoy!

Downloadable books for Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, an 4th grades

Trek’s Travels is a series of 12 early readers for PK/K that can be read by your child or read to your child (by you or the computer) as they follow along with the words. Teaching tools including vocab, discussion questions, and related games are included.

Welcome to Reading is a collection of 4 series of early readers for K-2nd grade. Each can be read by your child or read to your child (by you or the computer) as they follow along with the words. Printable foldable books, vocabulary, questions, and additional teaching ideas are included.

The Classics is a collection of stories, nursery rhymes, and songs for your little learners in PK-2nd grade to enjoy. Each can be read by your child or read to your child (by you or the computer) as they follow along with the words.

Consistent Strategies to Use with Students of All Ages

Read, Read, Read! Read aloud. Read picture books. Pre-readers can even “read” pictures. Read books above your child’s reading level to promote vocabulary development. “Bedtime reading” is a great time for novels above level. Also, model reading for your children. If they see that you enjoy reading, they will also value reading.

Everything requires reading! No matter what you are doing, reading is involved. Look for opportunities for print at the grocery store, at church, in the car, on billboards, while watching television, during dinner preparation, or while assembling a new tool or toy.

Ask questions. Basic questions are Who? What? When? Why? How? This will train your child to remember details.

Develop comprehension skills. Ask your child to tell you something he remembers from the reading. Ask for his favorite part. Have a discussion about the book or chapter.

Get Started

Our Literacy Center is designed to help you determine where to begin reading instruction with your student. Read each statement. Continue reading until you reach a statement that is not true for your student. You will find links, techniques, and/or strategies to guide your instruction under each statement. You can also find some helpful tips for creating a literary environment in Teaching Reading Through Play: Week Four and tips for when to correct an error in Teaching Reading Through Play: Week Thirty-Three.

Pre-Readers

Modeling is the key in this step. Point out the cover of the book. Spend some time looking at the picture. When turning pages, verbalize that it’s time to turn the page so the student begins to understand that the story will continue as long as there are words and pictures.

When you are reading picture books aloud, point to your starting word (usually on the left of a page) on each page. It will help train the eyes to look in the correct spot. Sometimes, continue to guide your finger across the page. It is not necessary to point to each word all the time, as that will affect reading fluency.

Emerging Readers

Early Readers

  • Retelling is another word for summarizing. Questioning is a key component to teaching students to formulate a response to a story. Stories can include picture books, chapters from novels, Sunday School lessons, or even cartoons!
    • Some questions to ask are:
  • Who is the story about?
  • Where did the story take place?
  • What happened first? Next? Last?
  • What did the main character learn in the story?

As students see printed sentences, they should begin to notice that all sentences begin with a capital letter and end with a special mark. This will aid in fluency later as the student begins to pause at the end of a sentence. Making students aware of the ending of one sentence and the beginning of another will help master the skill.

  • Often the place of division can be heard within the word. A common method of finding syllables is clapping while saying the word. For example, the word cupcake has two syllables. Clapping once while saying “cup” and again while saying “cake” shows that the syllable division occurs between the cup and cake.
  • Watch: Big Ideas-Syllables
  • Reading Remedies: Phonics Review Week 7

Teaching Reading through Play – Week Nine: Benefit of Reading Nonsense Words

Teaching Reading through Play – Week Five: Reading Symbols and Logos

Teaching Reading through Play – Week Twenty-Five: Seeing Self as a Reader

Growing Readers

Teaching Reading through Play – Week Twenty-Eight: Building Confidence Through Shared Reading

Teaching Reading through Play – Week Thirty-Four: Strategies for Decoding an Unknown Word

This refers to being able to select the important words in text that aid in comprehension.  This skill can be practiced through simple questioning such as asking, “Which words in this passage help you understand what the story is about?”

  • Fluency means reading at an appropriate rate of speed. Accuracy means getting the words correct, without substituting. Appropriate expression at this stage means pausing at punctuation.
  • Teaching Reading through Play – Week Thirty-Two: Strategies and Games for Building Reading Fluency

This is a “self-correct” skill, meaning that after calling the incorrect word, the student realizes the mistake, then rereads the sentence or phrase correctly.

Prediction involves using what you know or have learned from the text to determine what will be next. This does not have to be an accurate prediction, only reasonable based on the text.

Fluent Readers

When a good reader encounters an unknown word, the reader looks to the rest of the sentence to identify the meaning. For example, in the sentence, “When sprayed with water, our cat sprints away,” picture a cat getting sprayed with water. What will happen? It will run quickly away. Sprints means runs quickly.

Fluency means reading at an appropriate rate of speed. Accuracy means getting the words correct, without substituting. Appropriate expression at this stage means pausing at punctuation.

Teaching Reading through Play – Week Twenty-Nine: Seeing Self as a Writer

Comprehension Skills

These are essential skills for a reader to be able to effectively understand the content of a passage of any genre. Skills should be taught after basic phonetic skills have been mastered.

You’ll find some fun comprehension games in the World Book Early World of Learning library. You can play Put the Story in Order (PK-1st), Story Concentration (PK-K), and Story Multiple Choice (1st).

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

  • Reality could happen. Perhaps it isn’t happening now, such as stories about life on the frontier. However, it is possible to occur. Fantasy is make believe.
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section
  • Sometimes, this is confused with making generalizations. Reading a text and determining an opinion about the event described is drawing conclusions.
  • Little Language Arts – Lesson 9
  • Cause is the reason something happened, and effect is what happened due to the reason. For example, Sally’s shoes were untied, and she tripped. The cause is that her shoes were untied, while the effect is that she tripped.
  • Little Language Arts – Lesson 6
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section
  • Summarizing text is giving the main events in the story. As the student gets older, summaries should be able to be condensed.
  • Little Language Arts – Lesson 22

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

  • Point of view is the narrator’s position in the story. The person who is telling the story will affect the amount of information given about certain characters or events.
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section
  • Creating a picture in your mind is a powerful tool to aid in comprehension of the story. As students read more fluently, these pictures will become more developed.
  • Little Language Arts – Lesson 8
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section
  • Examples include imagery, similes, analogies, rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration, onomatopoeia, hyperbole, foreshadowing, idioms, personification, humor, and sarcasm.
  • Little Language Arts – Unit One (Lessons 1-5)
  • Little Language Arts – Lesson 27 (Onomatopoeia)
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

  • Authors write text for four purposes: persuade, inform, entertain, explain. Each purpose has unique characteristics. Students should be able to identify what parts of the text were clues to the author’s purpose.
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section
  • Inference is a skill that involves using your own knowledge added to the author’s text to determine meaning. Sometimes we can infer feelings of characters.
  • Little Language Arts – Lesson 7

Graphic organizers include Venn Diagrams, various types of webs, KWL charts, concept maps, and character maps. You’ll find various printable templates in the World Book Student library.

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section

These skills are covered in the New National Fourth Reader and McGuffey’s Fourth Eclectic Reader, which are both included in the Grade Level Readers.

  • Genres are categories of writing. Examples include biography, non-fiction, poetry, fantasy, realistic fiction, autobiography, folktale, fairy tale, historical fiction, mystery, and science fiction. To create well-rounded readers, exposure to a variety of genres is ideal.
  • Reading Comprehension Skills and Templates in the Unit Studies and More section
  • Fun with Fairy Tales, Lessons 1-9

More Resources

Can’t get to the library? Try these grade level readers!

Help for struggling learners and students with special needs.

Additional literacy resources

*Resources marked with an * are the copyright of Twinkl Ltd, all rights reserved. They are made available to you as part of your SchoolhouseTeachers.com membership through an agreement with Twinkl Ltd.