Introduction to Architecture - Schoolhouse Teachers

Introduction to Architecture

Length: 37 weekly lessons
Includes: Weekly lessons studying structures from ancient to modern times
Age/Grade: Middle – High School

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How to Use This Course

Introduction to Architecture brings your student components of architecture, as well as various structures including skyscrapers, bridges, castles, and more. Your student will learn about various aspects of each structure, including the point in history when it was built, its function, the architects, and the basic science behind its stability. The course includes reading assignments, videos, map activities, and hands-on activities. In order to receive one full high school credit, all activities marked with an asterisk (*) must be completed. If fewer activities are completed, students can receive one-half credit. As always, please be informed of your own state’s requirements.

Course Introduction

Welcome to Introduction to Architecture!

The first question I want to ask you is this: What is architecture? It might be easier to list things that come to mind than to come up with a specific definition. While the word “architecture” can encompass many different areas of life—structures, objects, city designs, flow of information, a plan for organizing space, etc.—we are going to focus on the art and science of designing and building structures—those used for living, working, worshiping, visiting, and traveling.

If you study ancient buildings, today’s skyscrapers, or tunnels built underwater, you’ll notice that architects have gotten pretty bold with their designs. Where one person might see an impossible situation, a truly gifted architect will figure out a way to surpass the previous limits that have been set. Because of this ingenuity and determination, we have more than utilitarian structures—we have works of art.

My interest in architecture began when I was a child. My brother and I had a garbage pail full of Legos. Whenever I would play with them, I would build houses. I rarely built anything else. My family also spent a lot of time touring mansions and other buildings. Four years after I graduated from college, I considered returning to pursue a degree in architecture. For various reasons, I never did. As a homeschooling mom, I’ve had the opportunity to teach subjects I enjoy at our co-op and 4-H group. One of these subjects is architecture.

Now I have the opportunity to share that interest with you. I hope you will enjoy this class and learn something along the way. Since I am not an architect, I will not be delving into the math or the use of CADD but will look at the basic science behind the components used within these structures, the architects behind them (where applicable), and the purpose for which they were created. I will end the course with a brief examination of the employment outlook for those who choose a career in architecture, the job duties, and the education and training required.

Weekly lessons studying structures from ancient to modern times. Course looks at the basic science behind the components used within these structures, the architects behind them (where applicable), and the purpose for which they were created.

Lesson 1 – Introduction/Architecture in the Beginning

  • Module 1 – Ancient Structures
  • Lesson 2 – Pyramids
  • Lesson 3 – Pantheon
  • Lesson 4 – Parthenon
  • Lesson 5 – Coliseum
  • Lesson 6 – Petra
  • Lesson 7 – The Great Wall of China

Bonus Lesson 8– Gingerbread Houses and Christmas Architecture

Module 2 – Transportation Structures

  • Lesson 9 – Tower Bridge
  • Lesson 10 – Brooklyn Bridge
  • Lesson 11 – Golden Gate Bridge
  • Lesson 12 – Panama Canal
  • Lesson 13 – Hoover Dam
  • Lesson 14 – Channel Tunnel

Module 3 – Living Structures

  • Lesson 15 – Neuschwanstein
  • Lesson 16 – Mount Vernon
  • Lesson 17 – Fallingwater

Module 4 – Entertainment/Touring Structures

  • Lesson 18 – Guggenheim
  • Lesson 19 – Eiffel Tower
  • Lesson 20 – Statue of Liberty
  • Lesson 21 – Washington Monument
  • Lesson 22 – Grand Canyon Skywalk
  • Lesson 23 – Spaceship Earth
  • Lesson 24 – Sydney Opera House

Module 5 – Skyscrapers

  • Lesson 25 – Empire State Building
  • Lesson 26 – Willis Tower
  • Lesson 27 – World Trade Center
  • Lesson 28 – Petronas Towers
  • Lesson 29 – Taipei 101
  • Lesson 30 – Burj Khalifa

Module 6 – Worship Structures

  • Lesson 31 – St. Basil’s Cathedral
  • Lesson 32 – Cathedral of Notre Dame
  • Lesson 33 – St. Peter’s Basilica

Module 7 – Government Structures

  • Lesson 34 – Capitol Building
  • Lesson 35 – Pentagon

Lesson 36 – Architectural Fails

Lesson 37 – The Architect

Download a printable course outline.

This course will run for nine months and is suitable for middle school and high school students. It is a lecture-based course with ample activities for high school students to obtain an elective full credit toward high school graduation requirements. Included in the course are reading assignments, videos, map activities, and hands-on activities. In order to receive 1 credit, all activities marked with an asterisk (*) must be completed. If fewer activities are completed, students can receive 0.5 credit.

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