Early American History - Schoolhouse Teachers

Early American History

Length: 16 Weekly Lessons
Includes: Lessons and Assignments
Age/Grade: Middle School

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How to Use This Course

This course studies America’s founding by taking a close look at the people who founded America and the documents and writings they left behind. Reading, research, critical thinking, and analysis are encouraged. Weekly lessons incorporate geography, history, art, Scripture, formal writing, and more. Answer keys are included.

Course Introduction

The basis of this course is to introduce students to historical research by studying America’s founding. Why is it important to study this period? How does learning our nation’s history help us today? How will studying this period prepare us for tomorrow?

Through reading, research, critical thinking and analysis, students will learn about the foundation of America. They will learn how the founding generation felt about issues relevant to their time that are still issues we face as a society today. In doing so, students shall be introduced to important eighteenth-century personalities who were elemental in the creation of the United States of America.

Beginning with an introduction to historical practice, the course covers the aftermath of the French and Indian War and stops at the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Students are expected to do extensive reading for this course. These readings can be found in various places. All the material is available in A Little Book of Revolutionary Quotes (Volume 1 and 2), two books I have compiled that are available on my website or on Amazon. I have also provided an alternative method for the required readings by providing links in the course to online sources. Students are welcome to use these links but will need to do extra research to find the material that specifically pertains to our lessons. All students should also have access to a copy of Common Sense by Thomas Paine.

This is a 16-week course based on my history curriculum Declaration of Independence available on my website: http://www.trehanstreasures.com/.

Course Outline

Printable weekly lessons with daily readings and/or assignments

Week 1
Day 1: The importance of studying 18th century American history
Day 2: Understanding primary sources
Day 3: Understanding secondary sources
Day 4: Map Skills: Identify the 13 colonies
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 2
Day 1: Outcome of the French and Indian War
Day 2: Impact of the French and Indian War on the American Colonies
Day 3: Map Skills: Identify the old and new British boundaries in America
Day 4: Personality of the Week: George Washington
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 3
Day 1: The Foundation of America
Day 2: Readings: 18th century thoughts on God
Day 3: Copywork: The Mayflower Compact
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Phillis Wheatley
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 4
Day 1: Principles of Liberty and Freedom
Day 2: Readings: 18th century thoughts on government
Day 3: Copywork: “The Liberty Song” by John Dickinson
Day 4: Personality of the Week: James Otis, Jr.
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week 

Week 5
Day 1: The Stamp Act of 1765
Day 2: Readings: 18th century thoughts on taxes
Day 3: Project
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Patrick Henry
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week 

Week 6
Day 1: The Declaratory Act
Day 2: Project
Day 3: Readings: Benjamin Franklin’s interview in London
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Benjamin Franklin
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 7
Day 1: The Townshend Acts
Day 2: Readings: The Townshend Acts
Day 3: Project
Day 4: Personality of the Week: George Mason
Day 5: Review Questions of the Week

Week 8
Day 1: The Boston Massacre
Day 2: The Aftermath of the Boston Massacre
Day 3: Readings: John Adams Soldiers’ Trial
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Crispus Attucks
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 9
Day 1: The East India Company
Day 2: The Tea Act of 1773
Day 3: The Sons of Liberty
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Samuel Adams
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 10
Day 1: The Boston Tea Party
Day 2: The Aftermath of the Boston Tea Party
Day 3: Readings: John Adams’s Diary
Day 4: Personality of the Week: John Hancock
Day 5: Review Questions of the Week

Week 11
Day 1: The Intolerable Acts
Day 2: Readings: 18th century thoughts on tyranny
Day 3: The First Continental Congress
Day 4: Personality of the Week: John Adams
Day 5: Review Questions of the Week

Week 12
Day 1: Battle of Lexington and Concord
Day 2: Copywork: Yankee Doodle
Day 3: The Minutemen
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Paul Revere
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 13
Day 1: Remembering the Ladies
Day 2: Readings: Abigail Adams’s letter to John Adams
Day 3: Project
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Mercy Otis Warren
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 14
Day 1: Common Sense
Day 2: Influence of Common Sense
Day 3: Readings: Common Sense
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Thomas Paine
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 15
Day 1: Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys
Day 2: The Battle of Bunker Hill
Day 3: Readings: 18th century thoughts on guns
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Benedict Arnold
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Week 16
Day 1: The Second Continental Congress
Day 2: Readings: Declaration of Independence
Day 3: Liberty Bell
Day 4: Personality of the Week: Thomas Jefferson
Day 5: Review Questions for the Week

Answer Key
Printable Course Outline

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